eri-10k_20161231.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10‑K

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period           to           

Commission File No. 001‑36629

ELDORADO RESORTS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

46‑3657681

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

100 West Liberty Street, Suite 1150

Reno, Nevada 89501

(Address of principal executive offices)

Telephone: (775) 328‑0100

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

 

 

Common Stock, $.00001, par value

 

NASDAQ Stock Market

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the Act:  None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S‑T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§299.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non‑accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer 

 

Accelerated filer 

Non‑accelerated filer 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant was $455.6 million at June 30, 2016 based upon the closing price for the shares of ERI’s common stock as reported by The Nasdaq Stock Market.

As of March 10, 2017, there were 47,120,000 outstanding shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be filed with the Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A in connection with the Registrant’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this report.  Such Proxy Statement will be filed with the Commission not later than 120 days after the conclusion of the Registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.

 

 

 

 

 


 

ELDORADO RESORTS, INC.

ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Part I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

1

 

 

 

 

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

13

 

 

 

 

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

26

 

 

 

 

Item 2.

 

Properties

27

 

 

 

 

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

27

 

 

 

 

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

27

 

 

 

 

Part II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrants’ Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

28

 

 

 

 

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

29

 

 

 

 

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

32

 

 

 

 

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

54

 

 

 

 

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

55

 

 

 

 

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

55

 

 

 

 

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

55

 

 

 

 

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

58

 

 

 

 

Part III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

59

 

 

 

 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

59

 

 

 

 

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

59

 

 

 

 

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.

59

 

 

 

 

Item 14.

 

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

59

 

 

 

 

Part IV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

 

Financial Statement Schedules

60

 

 

EXHIBITS

61

 

 

SIGNATURES

64

 

 

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF ELDORADO RESORTS, INC.

65

 

 

 

i


 

PART I

Item 1.  Business.

Eldorado Resorts, Inc., a Nevada corporation, is referred to as the “Company,” “ERI,” or the “Registrant,” and together with its subsidiaries may also be referred to as “we,” “us” or “our.”

Overview

We are a gaming and hospitality company that owns and operates gaming facilities located in Ohio, Louisiana, Nevada, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Our primary source of revenue is generated by our gaming operations, but we use our hotels, restaurants, bars, entertainment, racing, retail shops and other services to attract customers to our properties. ERI is dedicated to providing exceptional guest service, a dynamic gaming product, award-winning dining, exciting entertainment and premier accommodations. We were founded in 1973 in Reno, Nevada as a family business by the Carano family and continue to maintain our commitment to customer service, high-quality dining and outstanding amenities. We believe that our extraordinary level of personal service and the variety, quality and attractive pricing of our food and beverage outlets are important factors in attracting customers to our properties and building customer loyalty.

We own and operate the following properties:

 

Eldorado Resort Casino Reno (“Eldorado Reno”)—A 814‑room hotel, casino and entertainment facility connected via an enclosed skywalk to Silver Legacy and Circus Reno located in downtown Reno, Nevada;

 

Silver Legacy Resort Casino (“Silver Legacy”)—A 1,711‑room themed hotel and casino connected via an enclosed skywalk to Eldorado Reno and Circus Reno;

 

Circus Circus Reno (“Circus Reno”)—A 1,571-room hotel-casino and entertainment complex connected via an enclosed skywalk to Eldorado Reno and Silver Legacy;

 

Eldorado Resort Casino Shreveport (“Eldorado Shreveport”)—A 403‑room, all suite art deco‑style hotel and tri‑level riverboat dockside casino situated on the Red River in Shreveport, Louisiana;

 

Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack & Resort (“Mountaineer”)—A 354‑room hotel, casino and entertainment facility and live thoroughbred horse racing located on the Ohio River at the northern tip of West Virginia’s northwestern panhandle;

 

Presque Isle Downs & Casino (“Presque Isle Downs”)—A casino and live thoroughbred horse racing facility with slot machines, table games and poker located in Erie, Pennsylvania; and

 

Eldorado Gaming Scioto Downs (“Scioto Downs”)—A modern “racino” offering approximately 2,200 video lottery terminals (“VLT”) and harness racing located 15 minutes from downtown Columbus, Ohio.

In addition, Scioto Downs, through its subsidiary RacelineBet, Inc., also operates Racelinebet.com, a national account wagering service that offers online and telephone wagering on horse races as a marketing affiliate of TwinSpires.com, an affiliate of Churchill Downs, Inc.

1


 

Agreement to Acquire Isle of Capri Casinos, Inc.

On September 19, 2016, the Company entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Merger Agreement”) with Isle of Capri Casinos, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“Isle” or “Isle of Capri”), Eagle I Acquisition Corp., a Delaware corporation and a direct wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (“Merger Sub A”), and Eagle II Acquisition Company LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and a direct wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (“Merger Sub B”). The Merger Agreement provides for, among other things, (1) the merger of Merger Sub A with and into Isle, with Isle as the surviving entity (the “First Step Merger”), and (2) a subsequent merger whereby Isle will merge with and into Merger Sub B, with Merger Sub B as the surviving entity (the “Second Step Merger” and together with the First Step Merger, the “Mergers”). Isle’s stockholders may elect to exchange each share of Isle common stock held by such stockholder, at the effective time of the First Step Merger, for either $23.00 in cash or 1.638 shares of Company common stock. Elections are subject to proration and reallocation such that the outstanding shares of Isle common stock will be exchanged for aggregate consideration comprised of 58% cash and 42% Company common stock. The consummation of the Mergers is subject to receipt of approval of applicable gaming authorities and other customary closing conditions, and is expected to be consummated in the second quarter of 2017. The waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act (“HSR Act”) terminated on October 21, 2016. The Company and Isle of Capri received approval of each of their respective stockholders on January 25, 2017 at separate special meetings of stockholders. The obligation of the Company to consummate the Mergers is subject to the absence of a material adverse effect on Isle and the obligation of Isle to consummate the Mergers is subject to the absence of a material adverse effect on the Company. The obligation of the Company to consummate the Mergers is not subject to a financing condition.

Additionally, the Merger Agreement contains certain termination rights for both the Company and Isle including, among others, a mutual termination right if the Mergers have not been consummated on or prior to June 19, 2017 (which may be extended for an additional 90 days by either the Company or Isle if all of the conditions precedent other than the receipt of required gaming approvals have been satisfied). Upon the termination of the Merger Agreement under certain circumstances, the Company or Isle may be required to pay a termination fee of $60.0 million or $30.0 million, respectively. The foregoing description of the Merger Agreement does not purport to be complete and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of the Merger Agreement.

In connection with the execution of the Merger Agreement, on September 19, 2016, Recreational Enterprises, Inc. (“REI”), the Company and Isle entered into a voting agreement and GFIL Holdings, LLC (“GFIL”), the Company and Isle entered into a voting agreement pursuant to which, REI has agreed, among other things, to vote all of its shares of Company common stock in favor of the issuance of shares of Company common stock as stock consideration in the Mergers and GFIL has agreed, among other things, to vote all of its shares of Isle common stock in favor of the Mergers and adoption of the Merger Agreement.

Upon completion of the Mergers, the Company will add 12 additional properties to its portfolio after giving effect to the planned dispositions of Isle of Capri Casino Hotel Lake Charles and Lady Luck Casino Marquette. On August 22, 2016, Isle entered into an agreement to sell Isle of Capri Casino Hotel Lake Charles for aggregate consideration of $134.5 million, subject to certain adjustments. On October 13, 2016, Isle entered into an agreement to sell Lady Luck Casino Marquette for cash consideration of approximately $40.0 million, subject to certain adjustments.

In connection with entering into the Merger Agreement, on September 19, 2016, the Company entered into a debt financing commitment letter with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. as modified by the five separate written joinders to the Commitment Letter entered into by ERI and JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. with each of Macquarie Capital Funding LLC, KeyBank, National Association, Capital One, National Association, SunTrust Bank and U.S. Bank National Association and certain affiliates of such parties (the “Commitment Letter”). The Commitment Letter provides for: (a) a senior secured credit facility in an aggregate principal amount of $1.75 billion comprised of (i) a term loan facility of up to $1.45 billion and (ii) a revolving credit facility of $300.0 million and (b) an amount equal to at least $375.0 million in gross proceeds from the issuance and sale by the Company of senior unsecured notes or, if the notes are not issued and sold on or prior to the date of the consummation of the Mergers, an amount equal to at least $375.0 million in senior unsecured bridge loans under a senior unsecured credit facility. The proceeds of such borrowings may be used (w) to pay consideration in the Mergers, (x) refinance all of Isle’s existing credit facilities and senior and senior subordinated notes, (y) refinance the Company’s existing credit facility and (z) pay transaction fees and expenses related to the foregoing. The availability of the borrowings is subject to the satisfaction of certain customary conditions.

2


 

History

ERI was formed in September 2013 to be the parent company following the merger of wholly-owned subsidiaries of the Company into Eldorado HoldCo LLC (“HoldCo”), a Nevada limited liability company formed in 2009 that is the parent company of Eldorado Resorts LLC (“Resorts”), and MTR Gaming Group, Inc. (“MTR Gaming”), a Delaware corporation incorporated in 1988 (the “MTR Merger”). Effective upon the consummation of the MTR Merger on September 19, 2014 (the “MTR Merger Date”), MTR Gaming and HoldCo each became a wholly-owned subsidiary of ERI and, as a result of such transactions, Resorts became an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of ERI.

Prior to November 24, 2015 (the “Reno Acquisition Date”), Resorts owned a 48.1% interest in the joint venture (the “Silver Legacy Joint Venture”) which owns Silver Legacy.  On November 24, 2015, Resorts consummated the acquisition of all of the assets and properties of Circus Circus Reno and the 50% membership interest in the Silver Legacy Joint Venture owned by Galleon, Inc. (collectively, the “Circus Reno/Silver Legacy Purchase” or the “Reno Acquisition”) pursuant to a Purchase and Sale Agreement, dated July 7, 2015 (the “Purchase Agreement”), entered into with Circus Circus Casinos, Inc. and Galleon, Inc., each an affiliate of MGM Resorts International, with respect to the acquisition. On the Reno Acquisition Date, Eldorado Resorts LLC also exercised its right to acquire the 3.8% interest in Eldorado Limited Liability Company (“ELLC”) held by certain affiliates and stockholders of the Company. As a result of these transactions, ELLC and CC-Reno, LLC, a newly formed Nevada limited liability company, became wholly-owned subsidiaries of ERI, and Silver Legacy became an indirect wholly‑owned subsidiary of ERI.

Business Strengths and Strategy

Personal service and high quality amenities

We focus on customer satisfaction and delivering superior guest experiences.  We seek to provide our customers with an extraordinary level of personal service and popular gaming, dining and entertainment experiences designed to exceed customer expectations in a clean, safe, friendly and fun environment. Our senior management is actively involved in the daily operations of our properties, frequently interacting with gaming, hotel and restaurant patrons to ensure that they are receiving the highest level of personal attention. Management believes that personal service is an integral part of fostering customer loyalty and generating repeat business. We continually monitor our casino operations to react to changing market conditions and customer demands. We target both premium-play and value-conscious gaming patrons with differentiated offerings at our state-of-the-art casinos, which feature the latest in game technology, innovative bonus options, dynamic signage, customer-convenient features and non-gaming amenities at a reasonable value and price point.

Diversified portfolio across markets and customer segments

We are geographically diversified across the United States, with no single property accounting for more than 19% of our net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2016. Our customer pool draws from a diversified base of both local and out-of-town patrons. For example, approximately 20% of our customer base at Eldorado Reno is local, while 80% visit from out-of-town and utilize our hotel, restaurants and other amenities for a full-service gaming experience. We have also initiated changes to our marketing strategy to reach more potential customers through targeted direct mailings and electronic marketing. We believe we have assembled a platform on which we can continue to grow and provide a differentiated customer experience.

Management team with deep gaming industry experience and strong local relationships

We have an experienced management team that includes, among others, Gary Carano, our Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman of the Board, who has more than thirty years of experience in the gaming and hotel industry. Mr. Carano was the driving force behind ERI’s development and operations in Nevada and Louisiana and ERI’s acquisition of MTR Gaming and Circus Reno. In addition to Gary Carano, our senior executives have significant experience in the gaming and finance industries. Our extensive management experience and unwavering commitment to our team members, guests and equity holders have been the primary drivers of our strategic goals and success. We take pride in our reinvestment in our properties and the communities we support along with emphasizing our family-style approach in an effort to build loyalty among our team members and guests. We will continue to focus on the future growth and diversification of our company while maintaining our core values and striving for operational excellence.

3


 

Properties

As of December 31, 2016, we owned and operated approximately 503,000 square feet of casino space with approximately 9,750 slot machines and VLTs, 290 table and poker games, 45 restaurants and 4,900 hotel rooms.

For financial reporting purposes, we aggregate our properties into three reportable business segments: (i) Nevada, (ii) Louisiana and (iii) Eastern. For further financial information related to our segments as of and for the three years ended December 31, 2016, see Note 18, Segment Information, to our consolidated financial statements presented in Part IV, Item 15. Financial Statement Schedules.

The following table sets forth certain information regarding our properties as of and for the year ended December 31, 2016:

 

 

 

Year

Opened

 

Year

Acquired

 

Slot

Machines

and VLTs

 

 

Table and

Poker Games

 

 

Hotel

Rooms

 

 

Hotel

Occupancy

 

 

Average

Daily Rate

 

Nevada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eldorado Reno

 

1973

 

N/A

 

 

1,142

 

 

 

57

 

 

 

814

 

 

 

73.1

%

 

$

 

93.42

 

Silver Legacy (1)

 

1995

 

2015

 

 

1,212

 

 

 

63

 

 

 

1,711

 

 

 

60.6

%

 

$

 

97.62

 

Circus Reno

 

1978

 

2015

 

 

695

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

1,571

 

 

 

50.0

%

 

$

 

78.60

 

Louisiana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eldorado Shreveport

 

2000

 

2005

 

 

1,387

 

 

 

60

 

 

 

403

 

 

 

90.8

%

 

$

 

62.65

 

Eastern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mountaineer

 

1992

 

2014

 

 

1,510

 

 

 

46

 

 

 

354

 

 

 

79.3

%

 

$

 

48.80

 

Presque Isle Downs

 

2007

 

2014

 

 

1,594

 

 

 

39

 

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

 

 

 

N/A

 

Scioto Downs

 

2012

 

2014

 

 

2,206

 

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

 

 

 

N/A

 

(1)

Silver Legacy opened in 1995 and was a 50/50 joint venture between Resorts and MGM Resorts International until we acquired the remaining 50% interest in 2015.

Nevada

The Eldorado Reno, Silver Legacy and Circus Reno properties, (the “Reno Tri-Properties”) are connected in a “seamless” manner by enclosed, climate controlled skywalks. These enclosed skywalks serve as entertainment bridge ways between the three properties and house slot machines, restaurants and retail shops. The Reno Tri-Properties comprise the heart of the Reno market’s prime gaming area and room base, providing the most extensive and the broadest variety of gaming, entertainment, lodging and dining amenities in the Reno area, with an aggregate of 4,096 rooms, 23 restaurants and enough parking to accommodate approximately 6,100 vehicles, and as of December 31, 2016, approximately 3,000 slot machines and 150 table and poker games. We believe that the centralized location and critical mass of these three properties, together with the ease of access between the facilities, provide significant advantages over other freestanding hotel/casinos in the Reno market.

In September 2016, the Company announced that it plans to invest more than $50.0 million in facility enhancements to Eldorado Reno, Silver Legacy and Circus Reno. Eldorado’s master plan for the three connected properties, which span eight city blocks in downtown Reno, will be phased over three years, and commenced in the fourth quarter of 2016.

Reno is located at the base of the Sierra Nevada Mountains along Interstate 80, approximately 135 miles east of Sacramento, California and 225 miles east of San Francisco, California. Reno, along with nearby Lake Tahoe, is a destination market that attracts year‑round visitation by offering gaming, numerous summer and winter recreational activities and popular special events. Consequently, we believe that our success is influenced to some degree by the Lake Tahoe market. We believe that approximately two‑thirds of visitors to the Reno market arrive by some form of ground transportation. Popular special events include the United States Bowling Congress Men’s and Open Championship bowling tournaments, National Championship Air Races, a PGA tour event, Street Vibrations, a motorcycle event, and Hot August Nights, a vintage car event. Based on information reported by the Nevada State Gaming Control Board, gaming revenues for the Reno/Sparks gaming markets were $723.3 million, $694.0 million and $671.6 million in 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

4


 

Eldorado Reno

We own and operate the Eldorado Reno, an 814‑room premier hotel, casino and entertainment facility. The interior of the hotel is designed to create a European ambiance where hotel guests enjoy panoramic views of Reno’s skyline and the majestic Sierra Nevada mountain range. We believe the attention to detail, décor and architecture have created an identifiable and innovative presence in the Reno market for Eldorado Reno. Eldorado Reno is centrally located in downtown Reno, Nevada.

Eldorado Reno currently offers:

 

Approximately 76,500 square feet of gaming space, with approximately 1,100 slot machines and 57 table and poker games;

 

814 finely‑appointed guest rooms, including 134 suites, which include “Eldorado Player’s Spa Suites” with bedside spas and one or two bedroom suites;

 

Ten restaurants, including the recently opened Hidden Pizza, featuring nationally‑recognized cuisine which ranges from buffet to gourmet, with an aggregate seating capacity of more than 1,400;

 

An approximately 560‑seat showroom, a VIP lounge, three retail shops, a versatile 12,010 square foot convention center and an outdoor plaza located diagonal to Eldorado Reno which hosts a variety of special events; and

 

Parking facilities for over 1,100 vehicles, including an approximately 640‑space self‑park garage, a 120‑space surface parking lot and a 350‑space valet parking facility.

Silver Legacy

Silver Legacy, formerly a joint venture between Resorts and MGM Resorts International (the “Silver Legacy Joint Venture”) is the tallest building in northern Nevada consisting of 37-, 34- and 31-floor tiers. Silver Legacy’s opulent interior showcases a casino built around Sam Fairchild’s 120-foot tall mining rig, which appears to mine for silver. The rig is situated beneath a 180-foot diameter dome, which is a distinctive landmark on the Reno skyline. The interior surface of the dome features dynamic sound and laser light shows, providing visitors with a unique experience when they are in the casino. The Silver Legacy is centrally located in downtown Reno, Nevada.

Silver Legacy features:

 

Approximately 89,200 square feet of gaming space, with approximately 1,200 slot machines and 63 table games;

 

1,711 finely‑appointed guest rooms, including 141 player spa suites, eight penthouse suites and seven hospitality suites;

 

Eight restaurants, which have an aggregate seating capacity of more than 1,000, offering award winning dining cuisine; and

 

Retail shops, exercise and spa facilities, a beauty salon and an outdoor swimming pool and sundeck and a parking garage which can accommodate approximately 1,800 vehicles.

Circus Reno

Circus Reno is an iconic, circus‑themed hotel‑casino and entertainment complex with two hotel towers. It is conveniently located as the first casino directly off of Interstate 80 when entering downtown Reno, Nevada.

Circus Reno currently offers:

 

Approximately 55,000 square feet of gaming space, with approximately 700 slot machines and 27 table games;

 

1,571 hotel rooms, including 67 mini suites, four executive suites and four VIP suites;

 

3,200 parking spaces including a surface lot and two garages;

 

Six restaurants featuring a variety of cuisines; and

 

A midway featuring a total of 157 games, live circus acts, an arcade and a full service wedding chapel with reception services for groups of 25 or more.

5


 

Louisiana

Eldorado Shreveport

Eldorado Shreveport is a premier resort casino located in Shreveport, Louisiana, the largest gaming market in Louisiana, adjacent to Interstate 20, a major highway that connects the Shreveport market with the attractive feeder markets of East Texas and Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. There are currently six casinos and a racino operating in the Shreveport/Bossier City market in Louisiana and based on information published by the state of Louisiana, the Shreveport/Bossier City market generated $688.7 million, $732.5 million, and $736.1 million in gaming revenues in 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

Eldorado Shreveport is a modern, Las Vegas‑style resort with a gaming experience that appeals to both local gamers and out‑of‑town visitors. Our integrated casino and entertainment resort benefits from the following features:

 

A purpose‑built 80,634‑square foot barge that houses approximately 59,000 square feet of gaming space, offering approximately 1,400 slots, 52 table games and a poker room with eight tables;

 

Numerous restaurants and entertainment amenities, including a gourmet steakhouse, VIP check‑in, a premium quality bar and a retail store;

 

A luxurious 403‑room, all‑suite, hotel, with updated rooms featuring modern décor and flat screen TVs;

 

A 380‑seat ballroom with four breakout rooms, a 5,940‑square foot spa, a fitness center and salon, a premium players’ club and an entertainment show room; and

 

Two parking lots and an eight story parking garage providing approximately 1,800 parking spaces that connects directly to the pavilion by an enclosed walkway, including valet parking for approximately 300 vehicles.

Eastern

Mountaineer

Mountaineer is one of only four racetracks in West Virginia currently permitted to operate slot machines and traditional casino table gaming. Mountaineer is located on the Ohio River at the northern tip of West Virginia’s northwestern panhandle, approximately thirty miles from the Pittsburgh International Airport and a one‑hour drive from downtown Pittsburgh. Mountaineer’s market is comprised of nine casinos, including our Presque Isle Downs property, in West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Based on information published by these states, this market generated $1.6 billion, $1.6 billion, and $1.5 billion in gaming revenues in 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

Mountaineer is a diverse gaming, entertainment and convention complex with:

 

79,380 square feet of gaming space housing approximately 1,500 slot machines, 36 casino table games (including blackjack, craps, roulette and other games), and 10 poker tables and an outdoor smoking patio;

 

354 hotel rooms, including the 256‑room, 219,000 square foot Grande Hotel at Mountaineer, 27 suites, a full‑service spa and salon, a retail plaza and indoor and outdoor swimming pools and a golf course;

 

12,090 square feet of convention space, which can accommodate seated meals for groups of up to 575, as well as smaller meetings in more intimate break‑out rooms that can accommodate 75 people and entertainment events for approximately 1,500 guests;

 

Live thoroughbred horse racing conducted from March through December on a one‑mile dirt surface or a 7/8 mile grass surface with expansive clubhouse, restaurant, bars and concessions, as well as grandstand viewing areas with enclosed seating for 3,570 patrons;

 

On‑site pari‑mutuel wagering and thoroughbred, harness and greyhound racing simulcast from other prominent tracks, as well as wagering on Mountaineer’s races at over 1,400 sites to which the races are simulcast;

 

A 69,000 square foot theater and events center that seats approximately 5,000 patrons for concerts and other entertainment offerings; and

 

Surface parking for approximately 5,300 vehicles.

6


 

Presque Isle Downs

Presque Isle Downs located in Erie, Pennsylvania, opened for business in 2007 and commenced table gaming operations in 2010. Presque Isle Downs’ market is comprised of nine casinos, including Mountaineer, in West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Based on information published by these states, this market generated $1.6 billion, $1.6 billion, and $1.5 billion in gaming revenues in 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. The 153,400 square foot facility consists of:

 

61,400 square feet of gaming space housing approximately 1,600 slot machines, 32 casino table games and a seven table poker room, which we began operating on October 3, 2011;

 

Live thoroughbred horse racing conducted from May through September on a one‑mile track with a state‑of‑the‑art one‑mile synthetic racing surface with grandstand, barns, paddock and related facilities, and indoor and outdoor seating for approximately 750 patrons;

 

Five restaurants, including The Brew Brothers, a new microbrewery and restaurant which opened in May 2016, a steakhouse, buffet and 300 seat clubhouse overlooking the racetrack;

 

On‑site pari‑mutuel wagering and thoroughbred and harness racing simulcast from other prominent tracks, as well as wagering on Presque Isle Downs’ races at over 1,200 sites to which the races are simulcast; and

 

Surface parking for approximately 3,200 vehicles.

Scioto Downs

Scioto Downs is located in the heart of Central Ohio, off Highway 23/South High Street, approximately eight miles from downtown Columbus. The Columbus market generated $300.0 million, $290.4 million and $275.9 million in slot revenues in 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

Scioto Downs ran its first Standardbred horse race in 1959 and has since established a rich and deep connection within the regional racing community. Opening VLT operations with a new 132,000 square foot gaming facility on June 1, 2012, Scioto Downs became the first “Racino” operation in the State of Ohio and is one of only two licensed gaming facilities in the Columbus area.

In October 2015, the Company entered into a joint venture with Vista Host, Inc. to develop a new 118-room Hampton Inn & Suites hotel that will be attached to Scioto Downs. Construction of the new hotel began in November 2015 and is planned to open in March 2017. Scioto Downs is located on a 208 acre site strategically designed for future expansion, including table games, additional parking capacity and retail development.

Scioto Downs currently offers:

 

83,000 square feet of gaming space housing approximately 2,200 VLTs (with the ability to install up to 2,500 VLTs), including two outdoor smoking patios;

 

The Brew Brothers, a new microbrewery and restaurant which opened in October 2015 and seats approximately 230 offering live entertainment;

 

Six full service bars and six restaurants ranging from fine dining to a buffet;

 

Live standard bred harness horse racing conducted from May through mid‑September with barns, paddock and related facilities for the horses, drivers and trainers, that can accommodate over 8,000 patrons for live racing as well as a Summer Concert Series, featuring national acts;

 

On‑site pari‑mutuel wagering and thoroughbred, harness and greyhound racing simulcast from other prominent tracks, as well as wagering on Scioto Downs’ races at over 800 sites to which the races are simulcast; and

 

Surface parking for approximately 3,500 vehicles.

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Competition

The gaming industry includes land‑based casinos, dockside casinos, riverboat casinos, casinos located on Native American reservations and other forms of legalized gaming. There is intense competition among companies in the gaming industry, many of which have significantly greater resources than we do. Certain states have legalized casino gaming and other states may legalize gaming in the future. Legalized casino gaming in these states and on Native American reservations near our markets or changes to gaming laws in states surrounding Nevada, Louisiana, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, or Ohio could increase competition and could adversely affect our operations. We also compete, to a lesser extent, with gaming facilities in other jurisdictions with dockside gaming facilities, state sponsored lotteries, on‑and‑off track pari‑mutuel wagering, card clubs, riverboat casinos and other forms of legalized gambling. In addition, various forms of internet gaming have been approved in Nevada and New Jersey and legislation permitting internet gaming has been proposed by the federal government and other states. The expansion of internet gaming in Nevada and other jurisdictions could result in significant additional competition.

Nevada.  Of the 30 casinos currently operating in the Reno market, we believe we compete principally with four other hotel‑casinos that each generate at least $36 million in annual gaming revenues. At this time, we cannot predict the extent to which new and proposed projects will be undertaken or the extent to which current hotel and/or casino space may be expanded. We expect that any additional rooms added in the Reno market will increase competition for visitor revenue. There can be no assurance that any growth in Reno’s current room base or gaming capacity will not adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations.

We also compete with hotel‑casinos located in the nearby Lake Tahoe region as well as those in other areas of Nevada. A substantial number of customers travel to both Reno and the Lake Tahoe area during their visits. Consequently, we believe that our success is influenced to some degree by the success of the Lake Tahoe market. While we do not anticipate a significant change in the popularity of either Reno or Lake Tahoe as tourist destination areas in the foreseeable future, any decline could adversely affect our operations.

Since visitors from California comprise a significant portion of our customer base, we also compete with Native American gaming operations in California. The State of California has signed and ratified compacts with Native American tribes, including casinos located in northern California, which we consider to be a significant target market. These Native American tribes are allowed to operate slot machines, lottery games and banking and percentage games on Native American lands.

We believe the Reno market draws over 50% of its visitors from California. As northern California Native American gaming operations have expanded, we believe the increasing competition generated by these gaming operations has negatively impacted, and may continue to negatively impact, principally drive‑in, day‑trip visitor traffic from our main feeder markets in northern California.

Louisiana.  The Shreveport/Bossier City, Louisiana gaming market is characterized by intense competition. We compete directly with five casinos, all but one of which have operated in the Shreveport/Bossier City market for several years and have established customer bases. In addition, we also compete with the slot machine facility at Louisiana Downs located in Bossier City and WinStar Casino and casino facilities owned by the Choctaw Nation located in Oklahoma. Casino gaming is currently prohibited in several jurisdictions from which the Shreveport/Bossier City market draws customers, primarily Texas. The Texas legislature has from time to time considered proposals to legalize gaming. Any such proposal would require an amendment to the Texas State constitution, which requires approval by two‑thirds of the Texas State Legislature and approval by a majority of votes cast in a statewide voter referendum. Such approvals would legalize gaming in Texas notwithstanding vetoes by the Governor of casino gambling bills. There can be no assurance that casino gaming will not be approved in Texas in the future, which may have a negative effect on our business. Eldorado Shreveport competes with several Native American casinos located in Oklahoma, certain of which are located near our core Texas markets. Because Eldorado Shreveport draws a significant amount of customers from the Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas area, but is located approximately 190 miles from that area, we believe we will continue to face increased competition from gaming operations in Oklahoma and would face significant competition that may have a negative effect on our business and results of operations if casino gaming were to be approved in Texas.

Eastern.  Mountaineer, Presque Isle Downs and Scioto Downs primarily compete with gaming facilities located in West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania, including, to a certain extent, each other, and gaming locations located in neighboring states including New York, Indiana and Michigan. In particular, Mountaineer (and to a lesser extent Presque Isle Downs) competes with other gaming facilities located in Pennsylvania.

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Mountaineer competes with smaller gaming operations conducted in local bars and fraternal organizations. West Virginia law permits limited video lottery machines (“LVLs”) in local bars and fraternal organizations. The West Virginia Lottery Commission authorizes up to 7,500 slot machines in these facilities throughout West Virginia. No more than five slot machines are allowed in each establishment licensed to sell alcoholic beverages, and no more than ten slot machines are allowed in each licensed fraternal organization. As of December 31, 2016, there were a total of approximately 1,000 LVL’s in bars and fraternal organizations in Hancock County, West Virginia (where Mountaineer is located) and the two neighboring counties (Brooke and Ohio counties). Although the bars and fraternal organizations housing these machines lack poker and table gaming, as well as the amenities and ambiance of our Mountaineer facility, they do compete with Mountaineer, particularly for the local patronage. While there are three other tracks and one resort in West Virginia that offer slot machine and table gaming, only one, Wheeling Island Casino, lies within Mountaineer’s market.

Scioto Downs competes with one other property in the Columbus, Ohio, market, Hollywood Casino, which offers both VLTs and table games.

Mountaineer’s, and to a lesser extent Presque Isle Downs’, racing and pari‑mutuel operations compete directly for wagering dollars with racing and pari‑mutuel operations at a variety of other horse and greyhound racetracks that conduct pari‑mutuel gaming. Mountaineer competes with racetracks across the country to have its signal carried by off‑track wagering parlors. Mountaineer, Presque Isle Downs and Scioto Downs also competes for wagering dollars with off‑track wagering facilities in Ohio and Pennsylvania, and competes with other racetracks for participation by quality racehorses.

General.  All of our gaming operations also compete to a lesser extent with operations in other locations, including Native American lands, and with other forms of legalized gaming in the United States, including state‑sponsored lotteries, on‑ and off‑track wagering, high‑stakes bingo, card parlors, and Internet gaming. In addition, casinos in Canada have likewise recently begun advertising and increasing promotional activities in our target markets. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business—We face substantial competition in the hotel and casino industry and expect that such competition will continue” which is included elsewhere in this report.

Governmental Gaming Regulations

The gaming and racing industries are highly regulated and we must maintain our licenses and pay gaming taxes to continue our operations. We are subject to extensive regulation under laws, rules and supervisory procedures primarily in the jurisdictions where our facilities are located or docked. These laws, rules and regulations generally concern the responsibility, financial stability and characters of the owners, managers, and persons with financial interests in the gaming operations. If additional gaming regulations are adopted in a jurisdiction in which we operate, such regulations could impose restrictions or costs that could have a significant adverse effect on us. From time to time, various proposals have been introduced in legislatures of jurisdictions in which we have operations that, if enacted, could adversely affect the tax, regulatory, operational or other aspects of the gaming industry and us. We do not know whether or when such legislation will be enacted. Gaming companies are currently subject to significant state and local taxes and fees in addition to normal federal and state corporate income taxes, and such taxes and fees are subject to increase at any time. Any material increase in these taxes or fees could adversely affect us.

Some jurisdictions, including those in which we are licensed, empower their regulators to investigate participation by licensees in gaming outside their jurisdiction and require access to periodic reports respecting those gaming activities. Violations of laws in one jurisdiction could result in disciplinary action in other jurisdictions.

Under provisions of gaming laws in jurisdictions in which we have operations, and under our organizational documents, certain of our securities are subject to restriction on ownership which may be imposed by specified governmental authorities. The restrictions may require a holder of our securities to dispose of the securities or, if the holder refuses, or is unable, to dispose of the securities, we may be required to repurchase the securities.

A more detailed description of the regulations to which we are subject is contained in Exhibit 99.1 to this Annual Report on Form 10‑K, which is incorporated herein by reference.

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Reporting and Record‑Keeping Requirements

We are required periodically to submit detailed financial and operating reports and furnish any other information about us and our subsidiaries which gaming authorities may require. We are required to maintain a current stock ledger which may be examined by gaming authorities at any time. If any securities are held in trust by an agent or by a nominee, the record holder may be required to disclose the identity of the beneficial owner to gaming authorities. A failure to make such disclosure may be grounds for finding the record holder unsuitable. Gaming authorities may, and in certain jurisdictions do, require certificates for our securities to bear a legend indicating that the securities are subject to specified gaming laws.

Taxation

Gaming companies are typically subject to significant taxes and fees in addition to normal federal, state and local income taxes, and such taxes and fees are subject to increase at any time. We pay substantial taxes and fees with respect to our operations. From time to time, federal, state, local and provincial legislators and officials have proposed changes in tax laws, or in the administration of such laws, affecting the gaming industry. It is not possible to determine with certainty the likelihood of changes in tax laws or in the administration of such laws.

Internal Revenue Service Regulations

The Internal Revenue Service requires operators of casinos located in the United States to file information returns for U.S. citizens, including names and addresses of winners, for keno, bingo and slot machine winnings in excess of stipulated amounts. The Internal Revenue Service also requires operators to withhold taxes on some keno, bingo and slot machine winnings of nonresident aliens. We are unable to predict the extent to which these requirements, if extended, might impede or otherwise adversely affect operations of, and/or income from, the other games.

Regulations adopted by the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network of the Treasury Department (“FINCEN”) and the Nevada Gaming Authorities require the reporting of currency transactions in excess of $10,000 occurring within a gaming day, including identification of the patron by name and social security number. This reporting obligation began in May 1985 and may have resulted in the loss of gaming revenues to jurisdictions outside the United States which are exempt from the ambit of these regulations. In addition to currency transaction reporting requirements, suspicious financial activity is also required to be reported to FINCEN.

Other Laws and Regulations

Our businesses are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations in addition to gaming regulations. These laws and regulations include, but are not limited to, restrictions and conditions concerning alcoholic beverages, food service, smoking, environmental matters, employees and employment practices, currency transactions, taxation, zoning and building codes, and marketing and advertising. Such laws and regulations could change or could be interpreted differently in the future, or new laws and regulations could be enacted. Material changes, new laws or regulations, or material differences in interpretations by courts or governmental authorities could adversely affect our operating results.

The sale of alcoholic beverages is subject to licensing, control and regulation by applicable local regulatory agencies. All licenses are revocable and are not transferable. The agencies involved have full power to limit, condition, suspend or revoke any license, and any disciplinary action could, and revocation would, have a material adverse effect upon our operations.

Intellectual Property

We use a variety of trade names, service marks, trademarks, patents and copyrights in our operations and believe that we have all the licenses necessary to conduct our continuing operations. We have registered several service marks, trademarks, patents and copyrights with the United States Patent and Trademark Office or otherwise acquired the licenses to use those which are material to conduct our business. We also own patents relating to unique casino games. We file copyright applications to protect our creative artworks, which are often featured in property branding, as well as our distinctive website content.

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Seasonality

Casino, hotel and racing operations in our markets are subject to seasonal variation. Winter conditions can frequently adversely affect transportation routes to each of our properties and also may cause cancellations of live horse racing at the Eastern properties. As a result, unfavorable seasonal conditions could have a material adverse effect on our operations.

Environmental Matters

We are subject to various federal, state and local environmental, health and safety laws and regulations, including those relating to the use, storage, discharge, emission and disposal of hazardous materials and solid, animal and hazardous wastes and exposure to hazardous materials. Such laws and regulations can impose liability on potentially responsible parties, including the owners or operators of real property, to clean up, or contribute to the cost of cleaning up, sites at which hazardous wastes or materials were disposed of or released. In addition to investigation and remediation liabilities that could arise under such laws and regulations, we could also face personal injury, property damage, fines or other claims by third parties concerning environmental compliance or contamination or exposure to hazardous materials, and could be subject to significant fines or penalties for any violations. We have from time to time been responsible for investigating and remediating, or contributing to remediation costs related to, contamination located at or near certain of our facilities, including contamination related to underground storage tanks and groundwater contamination arising from prior uses of land on which certain of our facilities are located. In addition, we have been, and may in the future be, required to manage, abate, remove or contain manure and wastewater generated by concentrated animal feeding operations due to our racetrack operations, mold, lead, asbestos‑containing materials or other hazardous conditions found in or on our properties. Although we have incurred, and expect that we will continue to incur, costs related to the investigation, identification and remediation of hazardous materials or conditions known or discovered to exist at our properties, those costs have not had, and are not expected to have, a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flow.

Employees

As of December 31, 2016, we had approximately 7,400 employees. As of such date, we had 11 collective bargaining agreements covering approximately 900 employees. No collective bargaining agreements covering sizable numbers of our employees are scheduled to expire in 2017.

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward‑Looking Information

This report includes “forward‑looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward‑looking statements include statements regarding our strategies, objectives and plans for future development or acquisitions of properties or operations, as well as expectations, future operating results and other information that is not historical information. When used in this report, the terms or phrases such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “projects,” “plans,” “intends,” “expects,” “might,” “may,” “estimates,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “will likely continue,” and variations of such words or similar expressions are intended to identify forward‑looking statements. Forward‑looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and we assume no duty to update forward‑looking statements. Although our expectations, beliefs and projections are expressed in good faith and with what we believe is a reasonable basis, there can be no assurance that these expectations, beliefs and projections will be realized. There are a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward‑looking statements which are included elsewhere in this report. Other factors beyond those listed below could also adversely affect us. Such risks, uncertainties and other important factors include, but are not limited to:

 

Our substantial indebtedness and significant financial commitments could adversely affect our results of operations and our ability to service such obligations;

 

Restrictions and limitations in agreements governing our debt could significantly affect our ability to operate our business and our liquidity;

 

Our facilities operate in very competitive environments and we face increasing competition;

 

Our dependence on our Nevada, Louisiana, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio casinos for substantially all of our revenues and cash flows;

 

Our operations are particularly sensitive to reductions in discretionary consumer spending and are affected by changes in general economic and market conditions;

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Our gaming operations are highly regulated by governmental authorities and the cost of complying or the impact of failing to comply with such regulations;

 

Changes in gaming taxes and fees in jurisdictions in which we operate;

 

Risks relating to pending claims or future claims that may be brought against us;

 

Changes in interest rates and capital and credit markets;

 

Our ability to comply with certain covenants in our debt documents;

 

The effect of disruptions to our information technology and other systems and infrastructure;

 

Construction factors relating to maintenance and expansion of operations;

 

Our ability to attract and retain customers;

 

Weather or road conditions limiting access to our properties;

 

The effect of war, terrorist activity, natural disasters and other catastrophic events;

 

The intense competition to attract and retain management and key employees in the gaming industry; and

 

Other factors set forth under “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”

Additionally, the Isle Acquisition and the related Merger Agreement and provisions therein, will create additional risks, uncertainties and other important factors including but not limited to:

 

Our ability to consummate the Isle Acquisition on the timeline that we expect, or at all;

 

Limitations placed on the ability of ERI to operate its business in accordance with the terms of the Merger Agreement;

 

The potential impact of the announcement or consummation of the proposed transactions on the Company’s relationships with third parties, which may make it more difficult to maintain business and operational relationships;

 

The receipt of regulatory approvals;

 

The ability to satisfy other conditions to the closing of the Mergers for any other reason;

 

The availability of financing necessary to pay the cash consideration in the Mergers and refinance Isle’s outstanding indebtedness on terms that are satisfactory to us or at all;

 

Changes in or developments with respect to any litigation or investigation;

 

The risk that each of ERI’s and Isle’s executive officers and directors have financial interests in the Mergers that may be different from, or in addition to, the interests of ERI stockholders and Isle stockholders;

 

The potential that failure to consummate the Mergers could negatively impact the stock price and the future business and financial results of ERI;

 

The ability to successfully integrate ERI’s and Isle’s operations, technologies and employees;

 

The ability to realize growth opportunities and cost synergies from the proposed Mergers in a timely manner or at all;

 

Diversion of management time from ERI’s ongoing operations;

 

The incurrence of significant transaction and merger-related costs; and

 

The substantial amount of debt expected to be incurred in connection with the proposed Mergers and ERI’s ability to repay or refinance it, incur additional debt in the future or obtain a certain debt coverage ratio.

In light of these and other risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the forward‑looking events discussed in this report might not occur. These forward‑looking statements speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10‑K, even if subsequently made available on our website or otherwise, and we do not intend to update publicly any forward‑looking statement to reflect events or circumstances that occur after the date on which the statement is made, except as may be required by law.

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You should also be aware that while we from time to time communicate with securities analysts, we do not disclose to them any material non‑public information, internal forecasts or other confidential business information. Therefore, you should not assume that we agree with any statement or report issued by any analyst, irrespective of the content of the statement or report. To the extent that reports issued by securities analysts contain projections, forecasts or opinions, those reports are not our responsibility and are not endorsed by us.

Available Information

We file annual, quarterly and special reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). You may read and copy, at prescribed rates, any document we have filed at the SEC’s public reference room in Washington, D.C. Please call the SEC at 1‑800‑ SEC‑0330 (1‑800‑732‑0330) for further information on the public reference room. The SEC also maintains a website that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding registrants that file electronically with the SEC (http://www.sec.gov). You also may read and copy reports and other information filed by us at the office of The NASDAQ Stock Market, One Liberty Plaza, 165 Broadway, New York, NY 10006.

We make our Annual Reports on Form 10‑K, our Quarterly Reports on Form 10‑Q, our Current Reports on Form 8‑K, and all amendments to these reports, available free of charge on our corporate website (www.eldoradoresorts.com) as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports are filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. In addition, our Code of Ethics and Business Conduct and charters of the Audit Committee, Compensation Committee, and the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee are available on our website. We will provide reasonable quantities of electronic or paper copies of filings free of charge upon request. In addition, we will provide a copy of the above referenced charters to stockholders upon request.

References in this document to our website address do not incorporate by reference the information contained on the website into this Annual Report on Form 10‑K.

Item 1A.  Risk Factors.

Risk Factors Relating to our Operations

Our business is sensitive to reductions in discretionary consumer spending as a result of downturns in the economy and other factors outside our control

Consumer demand for casino hotel and racetrack properties such as ours is particularly sensitive to downturns in the economy and the associated impact on discretionary spending on leisure activities. Changes in discretionary consumer spending or consumer preferences brought about by factors such as perceived or actual general economic conditions, effects of declines in consumer confidence in the economy, including the recent housing, employment and credit crisis, the impact of high energy and food costs, the increased cost of travel, the potential for continued bank failures, decreased disposable consumer income and wealth, or fears of war and future acts of terrorism could further reduce customer demand for the amenities that we offer, which have had a negative impact on our results of operations in the past and could negatively impact our results of operations in the future. Increases in gasoline prices, including increases prompted by global political and economic instabilities, can adversely affect our operations because most of our patrons travel to our properties by car or on airlines that may pass on increases in fuel costs to passengers in the form of higher ticket prices. In addition, security concerns, terrorist attacks and other geopolitical events can have a material adverse effect on leisure and business travel, discretionary spending and other areas of economic behavior that directly impact the gaming and entertainment industries in general and our business in particular. Economic downturns, geopolitical events and other related factors which impact discretionary consumer spending and other economic activities have had direct effects on our business and the tourism industry in the past. We cannot be sure how these factors will impact our operations in the future or the extent of the impact.

We face substantial competition in the hotel and casino industry and expect that such competition will continue

The gaming industry is characterized by an increasingly high degree of competition among a large number of participants, including land‑based casinos, dockside casinos, riverboat casinos, casinos located on racing tracks and casinos located on Native American reservations and other forms of legalized gaming. We also compete, to a lesser extent, with other forms of legalized gaming and entertainment such as online computer gambling, bingo, pull tab games, card parlors, sports books, fantasy sports websites, “cruise-to-nowhere” operations, pari-mutuel or telephonic betting on horse racing and dog racing, state-sponsored lotteries, jai-alai, and, in the future, may compete with gaming at other venues. In addition, we compete more generally with other forms of entertainment for the discretionary spending of our customers.

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Certain states have legalized casino gaming and other states may legalize gaming in the future. Legalized casino gaming in these states and on Native American reservations near our markets or changes to gaming laws in states surrounding our operations could increase competition and could adversely affect our operations. There has been significant competition in our markets as a result of the expansion of facilities by existing market participants, the entrance of new gaming participants into a market or legislative changes in prior years. For example, casino gaming is currently prohibited in several jurisdictions from which the Shreveport/Bossier City market draws customers, primarily Texas. The Texas legislature has from time to time considered proposals to legalize gaming, and there can be no assurance that casino gaming will not be approved in Texas in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on Eldorado Shreveport. Additionally, since visitors from California comprise a significant portion of our customer base in Reno, we also compete with Native American gaming operations in California. Native American tribes are allowed to operate slot machines, lottery games and banking and percentage games on Native American lands. Although many existing Native American gaming facilities in northern California are modest compared to the Nevada properties, a number of Native American tribes have established large‑scale gaming facilities in California. In addition, various forms of internet gaming have been approved in Nevada, New Jersey and Delaware, and legislation permitting internet gaming has been proposed by the federal government and other states.  The expansion of internet gaming in Nevada and other jurisdictions could result in significant additional competition.

Gaming competition is intense in most of the markets in which we operate. There has been significant competition in our markets as a result of the expansion of facilities by existing market participants, the entrance of new gaming participants into a market or legislative changes in prior years. For example, casino gaming is currently prohibited in several jurisdictions from which the Shreveport/Bossier City market draws customers, primarily Texas. The Texas legislature has from time to time considered proposals to legalize gaming, and there can be no assurance that casino gaming will not be approved in Texas in the future, which may have a negative effect on our business. Additionally, since visitors from California comprise a significant portion of our customer base in Reno, we also compete with Native American gaming operations in California. Native American tribes are allowed to operate slot machines, lottery games and banking and percentage games on Native American lands. Although many existing Native American gaming facilities in northern California are modest compared to the Nevada properties, a number of Native American tribes have established large‑scale gaming facilities in California. An additional license has been granted for a casino to be located in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, approximately 45 miles from Mountaineer and 90 miles from Presque Isle Downs, which would result in further competition for both of those properties. Further, gaming facilities in Ohio that commenced operations in recent years present significant competition for Mountaineer, Presque Isle Downs and Scioto Downs.

Increased competition may require us to make substantial capital expenditures to maintain and enhance the competitive positions of our properties to increase the attractiveness and add to the appeal of our facilities. Because we are highly leveraged, after satisfying our obligations under our outstanding indebtedness, there can be no assurance that we will have sufficient funds to undertake these expenditures or that we will be able to obtain sufficient financing to fund such expenditures. If we are unable to make such expenditures, our competitive position could be negatively affected.

We are subject to extensive state and local regulation and licensing, and gaming authorities have significant control over our operations, which could have an adverse effect on our business

Licensing Requirements.  The ownership and operation of casino gaming, riverboat and horseracing facilities are subject to extensive federal, state, and local regulation, and regulatory authorities at the federal, state, and local levels have broad powers with respect to the licensing of gaming businesses and may revoke, suspend, condition or limit our gaming or other licenses, impose substantial fines, and take other actions, each of which poses a significant risk to our business, financial condition, and results of operations. We currently hold all state and local licenses and related approvals necessary to conduct our present gaming operations, but we must periodically apply to renew many of our licenses and registrations. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain such renewals. Any failure to maintain or renew our existing licenses, registrations, permits or approvals would have a material adverse effect on us. Furthermore, if additional laws or regulations are adopted or existing laws or regulations are amended, these regulations could impose additional restrictions or costs that could have a significant adverse effect on us. As an example, on August 26, 2014, the Board of Health of Hancock County, West Virginia adopted and approved the Clean Air Regulation Act of 2014 (“Regulation”), which became effective July 1, 2015. The Regulation bans smoking in public places in Hancock County including at Mountaineer. To comply with the Regulation upon its effective date, Mountaineer built a 9,300 square foot smoking pavilion which opened on July 1, 2015 and currently houses 322 slot machines and four table games. Notwithstanding our efforts to mitigate the impact of the smoking ban, the Regulation has had a negative impact on our business and results of operations at Mountaineer. We expect that the Regulation will continue to, and any similar regulations enacted in the future may, negatively impact our business and results of operations and such impact would be material.

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Gaming authorities with jurisdiction over our operations may, in their discretion, require the holder of any securities issued by us to file applications, be investigated, and be found suitable to own our securities if they have reason to believe that the security ownership would be inconsistent with the declared policies of their respective jurisdictions. Further, the costs of any investigation conducted by any of the Gaming Authorities under these circumstances must be paid by the applicant, and refusal or failure to pay these charges may constitute grounds for a finding that the applicant is unsuitable to own the securities. If any of the Gaming Authorities determines that a person is unsuitable to own our securities, then, under the applicable gaming or horse racing laws and regulations, we can be sanctioned, including the loss of approvals that are required for us to continue our gaming operations in the relevant jurisdictions, if such unsuitable person does not timely sell our securities.

Our officers, directors, and key employees are also subject to a variety of regulatory requirements and various licensing and related approval procedures in the various jurisdictions in which we operate gaming facilities. If any of the applicable Gaming Authorities were to find an officer, director or key employee of ours unsuitable for licensing or unsuitable to continue having a relationship with us, we would have to sever all relationships with that person. Furthermore, the Gaming Authorities may require us to terminate the employment of any person who refuses to file appropriate applications. Either result could materially adversely affect our gaming operations.

Applicable gaming laws and regulations restrict our ability to issue securities, incur debt and undertake other financing activities. Such transactions would generally require approval of applicable Gaming Authorities, and our financing counterparties, including lenders, might be subject to various licensing and related approval procedures in the various jurisdictions in which we operate gaming facilities. If state regulatory authorities were to find any person unsuitable with regard to his, her or its relationship to us or any of our subsidiaries, we would be required to sever our relationships with that person, which could materially adversely affect our business.

Compliance with Other Laws.  We are also subject to a variety of other federal, state and local laws, rules, regulations and ordinances that apply to non-gaming businesses, including zoning, environmental, construction and land-use laws and regulations governing the serving of alcoholic beverages. Under various federal, state and local laws and regulations, an owner or operator of real property may be held liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous or toxic substances or wastes located on its property, regardless of whether or not the present owner or operator knows of, or is responsible for, the presence of such substances or wastes. We have not identified any issues associated with our properties that could reasonably be expected to have a material adverse effect on us or the results of our operations. However, several of our properties are located in industrial areas or were used for industrial purposes for many years. As a consequence, it is possible that historical or neighboring activities have affected one or more of our properties and that, as a result, environmental issues could arise in the future, the precise nature of which we cannot now predict. The coverage and attendant compliance costs associated with these laws, regulations and ordinances may result in future additional costs.

Regulations adopted by FINCEN require us to report currency transactions in excess of $10,000 occurring within a gaming day, including identification of the patron by name and social security number. U.S. Treasury Department regulations also require us to report certain suspicious activity, including any transaction that exceeds $5,000, if we know, suspect or have reason to believe that the transaction involves funds from illegal activity or is designed to evade federal regulations or reporting requirements. Substantial penalties can be imposed if we fail to comply with these regulations. FINCEN has recently increased its focus on gaming companies.

We are required to report certain customer’s gambling winnings via form W-2G to comply with current Internal Revenue Service regulations. Should these regulations change, we would expect to incur additional costs to comply with the revised reporting requirements.

A new rule implemented by the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”), which was expected to become effective December 1, 2016, provides that certain exempt salaried employees making below $47,476 annually will be eligible for overtime. We expect to incur additional costs associated with complying with this revised rule. In November 2016, a U.S. District Court of the Eastern District of Texas issued a preliminary injunction enjoining the implementation of the DOL rule.

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Taxation and Fees. In addition, gaming companies are generally subject to significant revenue-based taxes and fees in addition to normal federal, state, and local income taxes, and such taxes and fees are subject to increase at any time. We pay substantial taxes and fees with respect to our operations. From time to time, federal, state, and local legislators and officials have proposed changes in tax laws, or in the administration of such laws, affecting the gaming industry. In addition, worsening economic conditions could intensify the efforts of state and local governments to raise revenues through increases in gaming taxes and/or property taxes. It is not possible to determine with certainty the likelihood of changes in tax laws or in the administration of such laws. Such changes, if adopted, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The large number of state and local governments with significant current or projected budget deficits makes it more likely that those governments that currently permit gaming will seek to fund such deficits with new or increased gaming taxes and/or property taxes, and worsening economic conditions could intensify those efforts. Any material increase, or the adoption of additional taxes or fees, could have a material adverse effect on our future financial results.

We rely on our key personnel and we may face difficulties in attracting and retaining qualified employees for our casinos and race tracks

Our future success will depend upon, among other things, our ability to keep our senior executives and highly qualified employees. We compete with other potential employers for employees, and we may not succeed in hiring or retaining the executives and other employees that we need. A sudden loss of or inability to replace key employees could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

In addition, the operation of our business requires qualified executives, managers and skilled employees with gaming and horse racing industry experience and qualifications who are able to obtain the requisite licenses and approval from the applicable Gaming Authorities. While not currently the case, there has from time to time been a shortage of skilled labor in our markets. In addition to limitations that may otherwise exist in the supply of skilled labor, the continued expansion of gaming near our facilities, including the expansion of Native American gaming, may make it more difficult for us to attract qualified individuals. While we believe that we will continue to be able to attract and retain qualified employees, shortages of skilled labor will make it increasingly difficult and expensive to attract and retain the services of a satisfactory number of qualified employees, and we may incur higher costs than expected as a result.

Our operations in certain jurisdictions depend on agreements with third parties

Our operations in several jurisdictions depend on agreements with third parties. If we are unable to renew these agreements on satisfactory terms as they expire, our business may be disrupted and, in the event of disruptions in multiple jurisdictions, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

For example, the Federal Interstate Horse Racing Act and the state racing laws in West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania require that, in order to simulcast races, we have written agreements with the horse owners and trainers at those racetracks. In addition, in order to operate slot machines in West Virginia, we are required to enter into written agreements regarding the proceeds of the slot machines (a “proceeds agreement”) with a representative of a majority of the horse owners and trainers and with a representative of a majority of the pari‑mutuel clerks.

If we fail to maintain operative agreements with the horsemen at any of our racetracks, we will not be permitted to conduct live racing and export and import simulcasting at the applicable racetrack. In addition, if we fail to maintain operative agreements with the horsemen at Mountaineer, Presque Isle Downs and Scioto Downs (including if we do not have in place the legally required proceeds agreement with the Mountaineer pari‑mutuel clerks union), we will not be permitted to continue our gaming operations at those facilities. If we fail to renew or modify existing agreements on satisfactory terms, this failure could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Work stoppages, organizing drives and other labor problems could negatively impact our future profits

Some of our employees are currently represented by labor unions. A lengthy strike or other work stoppages at any of our casino properties could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations. Given the large number of employees, labor unions are making a concerted effort to recruit more employees in the gaming industry. In addition, organized labor may benefit from new legislation or legal interpretations by the current presidential administration. Particularly, in light of current support for changes to federal and state labor laws, we cannot provide any assurance that we will not experience additional and more successful union organization activity in the future.

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Because portions of the land on which our facilities are situated are leased, the termination of such leases could adversely affect our business

We lease certain parcels of land on which several of our properties are located, including a portion of the parcel on which Eldorado Reno is located, the land on which Eldorado Shreveport is built and a portion of the property on which Circus Reno is located. As a ground lessee, we have the right to use the leased land; however, we do not hold fee ownership in the underlying land. Accordingly, with respect to the leased land, we will have no interest in the land or improvements thereon at the expiration of the ground leases. Moreover, since we do not completely control the land underlying the property, a landowner could take certain actions to disrupt our rights in the land leased under the long-term leases which are beyond our control. If the entity owning any leased land chose to disrupt our use either permanently or for a significant period of time, then the value of our assets could be impaired and our business and operations could be adversely affected. If we were to default on any one or more of these leases, the applicable lessors could terminate the affected leases and we could lose possession of the affected land and any improvements on the land, including the hotels and casinos. This would have a significant adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations as we would then be unable to operate all or portions of the affected facilities and may result in the default under the agreements governing our indebtedness.

Because we own real property, we will be subject to extensive environmental regulation, which creates uncertainty regarding future environmental expenditures and liabilities

We are subject to various federal, state and local environmental, health and safety laws and regulations that govern activities that may have adverse environmental effects, such as discharges to air and water, as well as the use, storage, discharge, emission and disposal of solid, animal and hazardous wastes and exposure to hazardous materials. These laws and regulations are complex and frequently subject to change. In addition, our horseracing facilities are subject to laws and regulations that address the impacts of manure and wastewater generated by Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (“CAFO”) on water quality, including, but not limited to, storm water discharges. CAFO regulations include permit requirements and water quality discharge standards. Enforcement of CAFO regulations has been receiving increased governmental attention. Compliance with these and other environmental laws can, in some circumstances, require significant capital expenditures. We have from time to time been responsible for investigating and remediating, or contributing to remediation costs related to, contamination located at or near certain of our facilities, including contamination related to underground storage tanks and groundwater contamination arising from prior uses of land on which certain of our facilities are located. In addition, we have been, and may in the future be, required to manage, abate, remove or contain manure and wastewater generated by concentrated animal feeding operations due to our racetrack operations, mold, lead, asbestos‑containing materials or other hazardous conditions found in or on our properties. Moreover, violations can result in significant fines or penalties and, in some instances, interruption or cessation of operations.

We are also subject to laws and regulations that create liability and cleanup responsibility for releases of regulated materials into the environment. Certain of these laws and regulations impose strict, and under certain circumstances joint and several, liability on a current or previous owner or operator of property for the costs of remediating regulated materials on or emanating from its property. The costs of investigation, remediation or removal of those substances may be substantial.

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An earthquake, flood, other natural disaster or act of terrorism could adversely affect our business

Although we maintain insurance that is customary and appropriate for our business, each of our insurance policies is subject to certain exclusions. In addition, in some cases our property insurance coverage is combined among certain of our properties or is otherwise in an amount that may be significantly less than the expected replacement cost of rebuilding our facilities in the event of a total loss. Such losses may occur as a result of any number of casualty events, including as a result of earthquakes, floods, hurricanes or other severe weather conditions. In particular, the Reno area has been, and may in the future be, subject to earthquakes and other natural disasters and Eldorado Shreveport is located in a designated flood zone. Inadequate insurance or lack of available insurance for these and other certain types or levels of risk could expose us to significant losses in the event that a catastrophe occurred for which we are underinsured. In addition to the damage caused to our properties by a casualty loss, we may suffer business disruption as a result of the casualty event or be subject to claims by third parties that may be injured or harmed. While we carry general liability insurance and business interruption insurance, there can be no assurance that insurance will be available or adequate to cover all loss and damage to which our business or our assets might be subjected. In addition, certain casualty events, such as labor strikes, nuclear events, loss of income due to terrorism, deterioration or corrosion, insect or animal damage and pollution, may not be covered under our policies. Any losses we incur that are not adequately covered by insurance may decrease our future operating income, require us to fund replacements or repairs for destroyed property and reduce the funds available for payments of our obligations. Further, we renew our insurance policies on an annual basis. The cost of coverage may become so high that we may need to further reduce our policy limits or agree to certain exclusions from coverage. Among other factors, it is possible that regional political tensions, homeland security concerns, other catastrophic events or any change in government legislation governing insurance coverage for acts of terrorism could materially adversely affect available insurance coverage and result in increased premiums on available coverage (which may cause us to elect to reduce its policy limits), additional exclusions from coverage or higher deductibles. Among other potential future adverse changes, in the future we may elect to not, or may not be able to, obtain any coverage for losses due to acts of terrorism.

We are subject to risks relating to mechanical failure, forces of nature, casualty, extraordinary maintenance and other causes

All of our facilities will generally be subject to the risk that operations could be halted for a temporary or extended period of time, as the result of casualty, forces of nature, mechanical failure, or extended or extraordinary maintenance, among other causes. In addition, our gaming operations could be damaged or halted due to extreme weather conditions. These risks are particularly pronounced at Eldorado Shreveport’s riverboat and dockside facilities because of their location on and adjacent to water.

We are or may become involved in legal proceedings that, if adversely adjudicated or settled, could impact our business and financial condition

From time to time, we are named in lawsuits or other legal proceedings relating to our respective businesses. In particular, the nature of our business subjects us to the risk of lawsuits filed by customers, past and present employees, competitors, business partners and others in the ordinary course of business. As with all legal proceedings, no assurances can be given as to the outcome of these matters. Moreover, legal proceedings can be expensive and time consuming, and we may not be successful in defending or prosecuting these lawsuits, which could result in settlements or damages that could significantly impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our information technology and other systems are subject to cyber security risk including misappropriation of customer information or other breaches of information security

Our operations require that we collect customer data, including credit card numbers and other personally identifiable information, for various business purposes, including marketing and promotional purposes. The collection and use of personal data are governed by privacy laws and regulations enacted in the United States and other jurisdictions around the world. Privacy regulations continue to evolve and on occasion may be inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another. Our information and processes are subject to the ever-changing threat of compromised security in the form of a risk of potential breach, system failure, computer virus, or unauthorized or fraudulent use by customers, company employees, or employees of third-party vendors. The steps we take to deter and mitigate these risks may not be successful, and any resulting compromise or loss of data or systems could adversely impact operations or regulatory compliance and could result in remedial expenses, fines, litigation, and loss of reputation, potentially impacting our financial results.

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In addition, third-party service providers and other business partners process and maintain proprietary business information and data related to our guests, suppliers and other business partners. Our information technology and other systems that maintain and transmit this information, or those of service providers or business partners, may also be compromised by a malicious third-party penetration of its network security or that of a third-party service provider or business partner, or impacted by intentional or unintentional actions or inactions by its employees or those of a third-party service provider or business partner. As a result, our business information, guest, supplier, and other business partner data may be lost, disclosed, accessed or taken without their consent.

Any such loss, disclosure or misappropriation of, or access to, guests' or business partners’ information or other breach of our information security can result in legal claims or legal proceedings, including regulatory investigations and actions, may have a serious impact on our reputation and may adversely affect its businesses, operating results and financial condition. Furthermore, the loss, disclosure or misappropriation of our business information may adversely affect our reputation, businesses, operating results and financial condition.

Our operations have historically been subject to seasonal variations and quarterly fluctuations in operating results, and we can expect to experience such variations and fluctuations in the future

Historically, our operations have typically been subject to seasonal variations. Our strongest operating results for our Reno properties have generally occurred in the second and third quarters and the weakest results have generally occurred during the period from November through February when weather conditions adversely affected operating results. Winter conditions can frequently adversely affect transportation routes to Reno, where approximately two‑thirds of our visitors arrive by ground transportation and certain of our other properties and cause cancellations of live horse racing. In particular, since January 1, 2017, the Reno-Tahoe area has experienced exceptionally high levels of snowfall in the first quarter of 2017, with certain resorts in the Tahoe area reporting over 50 feet of snowfall during such time, which has adversely affected visitation to our Reno properties and may adversely affect our results of operations for the first quarter. As a result, unfavorable seasonal conditions could have a material adverse effect on our operations.

Because we will be heavily dependent upon hotel/casino and related operations that are conducted in certain limited regions, we will be subject to greater risks than a company that is geographically or otherwise more diversified

Our business is heavily dependent upon hotel/casino and related operations that are conducted in three discrete markets. As a result, we are still subject to a greater degree of risk than a gaming company that has greater geographical diversity. The risks to which we have a greater degree of exposure include the following:

 

local economic and competitive conditions;

 

inaccessibility due to weather conditions, road construction or closure of primary access routes;

 

changes in local and state governmental laws and regulations, including gaming laws and regulations;

 

natural and other disasters, including earthquakes and flooding;

 

a decline in the number of residents in or near, or visitors to, our operations; and

 

a decrease in gaming activities at any of our facilities.

Any of the factors outlined above could adversely affect our ability to generate sufficient cash flow to make payments on our outstanding indebtedness.

Significant negative industry or economic trends, reduced estimates of future cash flows, disruptions to our business, slower growth rates or lack of growth in our business may cause us to incur impairments to indefinite-lived intangible assets or long‑lived assets

We test indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment annually or if a triggering event occurs. We will also be required to consider whether the fair values of any of our investments accounted for under the equity method have declined below their carrying value whenever adverse events or changes in circumstances indicate that recorded values may not be recoverable. Estimated fair value is determined using a discounted cash flow analysis based on estimated future results of the investee and market indicators of the terminal year capitalization rate. If any such declines are considered to be other than temporary, we will be required to record a write‑down to estimated fair value.

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The concentration and evolution of the slot machine manufacturing industry could impose additional costs on us

There are a limited number of slot machine manufacturers servicing the gaming industry and a large majority of our revenues are derived from slot machines at our casinos. It is important, for competitive reasons, that we offer the most popular and up-to-date slot machine games with the latest technology to customers.

In recent years, slot machine manufacturers have frequently refused to sell slot machines featuring the most popular games, instead requiring participating lease arrangements. Generally, a participating lease is substantially more expensive over the long-term than the cost to purchase a new slot machine.

For competitive reasons, we may be forced to purchase new slot machines, slot machine systems, or enter into participating lease arrangements that are more expensive than our current costs associated with the continued operation of its existing slot machines. If the newer slot machines do not result in sufficient incremental revenues to offset the increased investment and participating lease costs, it could adversely affect profitability.

We materially rely on a variety of hardware and software products to maximize revenue and efficiency in our operations. Technology in the gaming industry is developing rapidly, and we may need to invest substantial amounts to acquire the most current gaming and hotel technology and equipment in order to remain competitive in the markets in which we operate. Ensuring the successful implementation and maintenance of any new technology acquired is an additional risk.

We may experience construction delays or cost overruns during its expansion or development projects that could adversely affect our operations

From time to time, we may commence construction projects on new properties or at our current properties. We also evaluate other expansion opportunities as they become available and may in the future engage in additional construction projects. The anticipated costs and construction periods for construction projects are based upon budgets, conceptual design documents and construction schedule estimates prepared by us in consultation with its architects. Construction projects entail significant risks, which can substantially increase costs or delay completion of a project. Such risks include shortages of materials or skilled labor, unforeseen engineering, environmental or geological problems, work stoppages, weather interference and unanticipated cost increases. Most of these factors are beyond our control. In addition, difficulties or delays in obtaining any of the requisite licenses, permits or authorizations from regulatory authorities can increase the cost or delay the completion of an expansion or development. Significant budget overruns or delays with respect to expansion and development projects could adversely affect our results of operations.

Risk Factors Relating to the Isle of Capri Acquisition

The Merger Agreement subjects the Company to restrictions on its business activities during the pendency of the Mergers.

The Merger Agreement subjects the Company to restrictions on its business activities and obligates the Company to generally operate its businesses in the ordinary course in all material respects during the pendency of the Mergers. These restrictions could prevent the Company from pursuing attractive business opportunities that arise prior to the completion of the Mergers and are outside the ordinary course of business, and could otherwise have an adverse effect on ERI’s and Isle’s results of operations, cash flows and financial position.

Delay or failure to complete the Mergers would prevent the Company from realizing the anticipated benefits of the Mergers and each company would also remain liable for significant transaction costs, including legal, accounting and financial advisory fees.

Any delay in completing the Mergers may reduce the synergies and other benefits anticipated by the Company if it successfully completes the Mergers within the expected timeframe and integrates the businesses of the Company and Isle. In addition, the market price of each company’s common stock may reflect various market assumptions as to whether and when the Mergers will be completed. Consequently, the completion of, the failure to complete, or any delay in the completion of the Mergers could result in significant changes in the market price of the Company’s common stock. In addition, the Company has incurred and will continue to incur significant costs relating to the Mergers, such as legal, accounting, financial advisor and printing fees that will be required to be paid whether or not the Mergers are consummated. Further, the Company may be required to pay a termination fee depending on the circumstances surrounding the termination.

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Whether or not the Mergers are completed, the pendency of the transaction could cause disruptions in the businesses of the Company, which could have an adverse effect on its businesses and financial results.

These disruptions could include the following:

 

current and prospective employees of the Company may experience uncertainty about their future roles with the combined company or consider other employment alternatives, which might adversely affect the Company’s ability to retain or attract key managers and other employees;

 

current and prospective customers of the Company may anticipate changes in how they are served or the benefits offered by the Company’s loyalty reward program and may, as a result, choose to discontinue their patronage of the Company; and

 

the attention of management of the Company may be diverted from the operation of its business.

Obtaining required approvals and satisfying closing conditions may delay or prevent completion of the Mergers and may significantly reduce the benefits anticipated to be realized from the Mergers or could adversely affect the market price of the Company or its future business and financial results.

Completion of the Mergers is subject to various closing conditions, including (a) Isle’s stockholders adopting the Merger Agreement, (b) ERI’s stockholders approving the issuance of ERI shares as consideration in the Mergers, (c) the approval or expiration or termination of any applicable waiting period under the HSR Act, (d) obtaining certain gaming approvals to the standards set forth in the Merger Agreement and (e) each of Isle and ERI’s receipt of a tax opinion to the effect that the Mergers will be treated as a “reorganization” within the meaning of Section 368(a) of the Code. If such conditions are not satisfied, the Mergers will not be consummated unless such conditions are validly waived. Such conditions may jeopardize or delay completion of the Mergers or may reduce the anticipated benefits of the Mergers. Further, no assurance can be given that the required consents and approvals will be obtained or that the required conditions to closing will be satisfied. Even if all such consents and approvals are obtained, no assurance can be given as to the terms, conditions and timing of the consents and approvals or that they will satisfy the terms of the Merger Agreement. On October 21, 2016, the waiting period under the HSR Act was terminated early by the Federal Trade Commission. The Company and Isle of Capri received approval adopting the Merger Agreement of each of their respective stockholders on January 25, 2017 at separate special meetings of stockholders.

The Mergers are subject to the receipt of approvals, consents or clearances that may impose conditions that could have an adverse effect on ERI or, if not obtained, could prevent completion of the transactions.

Completion of the Mergers is conditioned upon the receipt of certain governmental approvals, including, without limitation, antitrust and gaming regulatory approvals. Although each party has agreed to use its respective reasonable best efforts to obtain the requisite governmental approvals, there can be no assurance that these approvals will be obtained and that the other conditions to completing the Mergers will be satisfied. In addition, the governmental authorities from which the regulatory approvals are required may impose conditions on the completion of the Mergers or require changes to the terms of the Merger Agreement or other agreements to be entered into in connection with the Merger Agreement. Such conditions or changes and the process of obtaining regulatory approvals could have the effect of delaying or impeding consummation of the Mergers or of imposing additional costs or limitations on ERI or Isle following completion of the Mergers, any of which might have an adverse effect on ERI or Isle.

Gaming regulatory approvals may not be received, may take longer than expected or may impose conditions that are not presently anticipated or cannot be met.

ERI and Isle must obtain approval of the Mergers, which approvals must be duly obtained without the imposition of material restrictions or conditions and be in full force and effect, from a variety of gaming regulatory authorities. These approvals may not be received at all, may not be received in a timely fashion, and/or may contain conditions on the completion of the Mergers. In addition, these regulatory bodies may impose conditions on the granting of such approvals. Such conditions and the process of obtaining regulatory approvals could have the effect of delaying completion of the Mergers or of imposing additional costs or limitations on ERI following the Mergers.

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If the financing contemplated by the Commitment Letter is not available, or alternative financing cannot be secured, the Mergers may not be completed and ERI may be required to pay a termination fee to Isle.

ERI intends to finance the cash required in connection with the Mergers, including expenses in connection with the Mergers, with debt financing in accordance with the terms of the Commitment Letter. The Commitment Letter provides for (a) a senior secured credit facility in an aggregate principal amount of $1.75 billion comprised of (i) a term loan facility of up to $1.45 billion and (ii) a revolving credit facility of $300.0 million and (b) an amount equal to at least $375.0 million in gross proceeds from the issuance and sale by ERI of senior unsecured notes or, if the notes are not issued and sold on or prior to the date of the consummation of the Mergers, an amount equal to at least $375.0 million in senior unsecured bridge loans under a senior unsecured credit facility. In the event some or all of the financing contemplated by the Commitment Letter is not available, ERI is obligated to use its reasonable best efforts to obtain alternative financing from alternative institutions in an amount sufficient to enable ERI to consummate the Mergers, refinance the outstanding indebtedness of Isle described in the prior paragraph and pay all fees and expenses of Isle in connection with the Mergers and the other transactions contemplated by the Merger Agreement. If financing cannot be obtained, the Mergers may not be completed. If ERI is unable to obtain funding from its financing sources for the cash required in connection with the Mergers, and Isle is otherwise ready, willing and able to close the Mergers, ERI may be liable to Isle for a financing failure fee of $60.0 million or may be compelled to specifically perform its obligations to consummate the transaction.

Litigation challenging the Mergers could delay or prevent the completion of the Mergers.

One of the conditions to the Mergers is that no temporary restraining order, preliminary or permanent injunction, or other judgment, order or decree issued by any court of competent jurisdiction or other legal restraint or prohibition preventing the consummation of the Mergers will be in effect; nor will there be any law, statute, ordinance, rule, regulation, order, policy, guideline or agency requirement enacted, entered, promulgated, enforced or deemed applicable by any governmental entity that prohibits or makes illegal the consummation of the Mergers. In connection with the Mergers, two class action lawsuits were filed by purported ERI stockholders alleging breach of fiduciary duty by the ERI board of directors in connection with the Mergers, one of which was dismissed. The pending lawsuit alleges, among other things, breach of fiduciary duty in failing to disclose all material information to ERI stockholders in seeking approval of the issuance of ERI shares in the Mergers and requests injunctive relief and an award of costs incurred by the plaintiffs in the actions.   There can be no assurance that additional claims will not be filed by stockholders of ERI or Isle seeking damages relating to, or otherwise challenging, the Mergers. If the plaintiffs in any such action secure injunctive or other relief prohibiting, delaying or otherwise adversely affecting ERI’s and Isle’s ability to consummate the Mergers, then such injunctive or other relief may prevent the Mergers from becoming effective within the expected time frame or at all. If consummation of the Mergers is prevented or delayed, it could result in substantial costs to ERI and Isle. In addition, ERI and Isle could incur significant costs in connection with such lawsuits, including costs associated with the indemnification of ERI and Isle’s directors and officers.

The integration of ERI and Isle following the Mergers may present significant challenges and impair ERI’s ability to realize the anticipated benefits of the Mergers in the anticipated time frame or at all.

ERI’s ability to realize the anticipated benefits of the Mergers will depend, to a large extent, on ERI’s ability to integrate Isle’s business into ERI in the anticipated time frame or at all. ERI may face significant challenges in combining Isle’s operations into its operations in a timely and efficient manner. The combination of two independent businesses is a complex, costly and time-consuming process. As a result, ERI will be required to devote significant management attention and resources to integrating the business practices and operations of Isle into those of ERI. The integration process may disrupt the business and, if implemented ineffectively or inefficiently, would preclude realization of the full benefits expected by ERI and Isle. The failure to successfully integrate Isle into ERI and to manage the challenges presented by the integration process successfully may result in an interruption of, or loss of momentum in, the business of ERI or Isle, which may have the effect of depressing the market price of ERI common stock following the Effective Time (as defined in the Merger Agreement).

ERI may be unable to realize anticipated cost synergies or may incur additional costs.

ERI expects to realize cost synergies from combining the sales and general and administrative functions of Isle and ERI. However, ERI will be required to incur costs, including severance and related expenses, to realize the anticipated cost savings. While ERI’s management believes the combined entity will benefit from cost synergies, ERI may be unable to realize all of these cost synergies within the time frame expected or at all. In addition, ERI may incur additional or unexpected costs in order to realize these cost synergies.

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The Mergers may not be accretive and may cause dilution to the combined company’s earnings per share, which may negatively affect the price of the common stock of the combined company following completion of the Mergers.

ERI currently anticipates that the Mergers will be accretive to the earnings per share of the combined company in 2017. This expectation is based on preliminary estimates and assumes certain synergies expected to be realized by the combined company over a 12-month period following the completion of the Mergers and the previously announced dispositions of Isle of Capri Casino Hotel Lake Charles and Lady Luck Casino Marquette. Such estimates and assumptions could materially change due to additional transaction-related costs, delays in regulatory approvals, the failure to realize any or all of the benefits expected in the Mergers or other factors beyond the control of ERI. All of these factors could delay, decrease or eliminate the expected accretive effect of the Mergers and cause resulting dilution to the combined company’s earnings per share or to the price of the common stock of the combined company.

Unanticipated costs relating to the Mergers could reduce ERI’s future earnings per share.

We believe that we have reasonably estimated the likely incremental costs of the combined operations of ERI and Isle following the Mergers. However, it is possible that unexpected transaction costs such as taxes, fees or professional expenses or unexpected future operating expenses such as unanticipated costs to integrate the two businesses, increased personnel costs or increased taxes, as well as other types of unanticipated adverse developments, could have a material adverse effect on the results of operations and financial condition of ERI following the Mergers. In addition, if actual costs are materially different than expected costs, the Mergers could have a significant dilutive effect on ERI’s earnings per share.

ERI will have a substantial amount of debt outstanding following the Mergers.

ERI expects that it will have approximately $2.2 billion of debt outstanding following the completion of the Mergers and related transactions. In addition, ERI expects that it will have the ability to incur additional debt under its $300.0 million revolving credit facility and may be required to incur additional indebtedness to finance the cash portion of the merger consideration if the sale of Isle of Capri Casino Hotel Lake Charles and/or the sale of Lady Luck Casino Marquette is not consummated prior to the closing of the Mergers. As a result of the increased levels of outstanding indebtedness following the Mergers, future interest expense and debt service obligations will be significantly higher than historic interest expense and the risks associated with its outstanding indebtedness will be intensified. Delay or failure to consummate the sale of the Isle of Capri Casino Hotel Lake Charles or the Lady Luck Casino Marquette may require ERI to incur additional debt to repay outstanding indebtedness of Isle or otherwise adversely impact the financial condition of the combined company.

On August 22, 2016, Isle entered into an agreement to sell Isle of Capri Casino Hotel Lake Charles for aggregate consideration of $134.5 million, subject to certain adjustments. On October 13, 2016, Isle entered into an agreement to sell Lady Luck Casino Marquette for cash consideration of approximately $40.0 million, subject to certain adjustments. The consummation of each transaction is subject to satisfaction of customary conditions, including receipt of regulatory approval, the accuracy of the representations and warranties, compliance with covenants, delivery of certain closing deliverables and the absence of any governmental order or action seeking to prohibit the consummation of the transaction. Although Isle expects the sale of Isle of Capri Casino Hotel Lake Charles to be consummated in Isle’s early fiscal 2018, there can be no assurance as to the timing of the closing of either sale or that the closings will occur on the terms set forth in the purchase agreements relating to the sales, or at all. In the event that the closing of either sale is delayed or does not occur, ERI may be required to incur additional indebtedness to repay debt outstanding under Isle’s credit agreement or outstanding notes, which could adversely impact the financial condition of the combined company.

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Risks Related to ERI’s Capital Structure and Equity Ownership

We have significant indebtedness

As of December 31, 2016, we and our restricted subsidiaries had $822.6 million of total indebtedness outstanding consisting of $375.0 million in aggregate principal amount of outstanding 7.0% senior notes due 2023 (“Senior Notes”), our $425.0 million term loan (the “Term Loan”) and amounts outstanding under our $150.0 million revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Credit Facility” and, together with the Term Loan, the “Credit Facility”). We expect to incur approximately $1.8 billion of additional debt in order to complete the Mergers and related transactions. In addition, as of December 31, 2016 we had the ability to incur approximately $121.0 million of additional debt under our Revolving Credit Facility and we expect that we will have the ability to incur additional debt under the $300.0 million revolving credit facility that we expect to enter into in connection with the Mergers.  Further, we may be required to incur additional indebtedness to finance the cash portion of the merger consideration if the sale of Isle of Capri Casino Hotel Lake Charles and/or the sale of Lady Luck Casino Marquette is not consummated prior to the closing of the Mergers. This indebtedness may have important negative consequences for us, including:

 

limiting our ability to satisfy our obligations;

 

increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

 

limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our businesses and the markets in which we operate;

 

placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared to competitors that have less debt;

 

increasing our vulnerability to, and limiting our ability to react to, changing market conditions, changes in our industry and economic downturns;

 

limiting our ability to obtain additional financing to fund working capital requirements, capital expenditures, debt service, general corporate or other obligations;

 

subjecting us to a number of restrictive covenants that, among other things, limit our ability to pay dividends and distributions, make acquisitions and dispositions, borrow additional funds, and make capital expenditures and other investments;

 

restricting our and our wholly-owned subsidiaries ability to make dividend payments and other payments;

 

limiting our ability to use operating cash flow in other areas of its business because we must dedicate a significant portion of these funds to make principal and/or interest payments on our outstanding debt;

 

exposing us to interest rate risk due to the variable interest rate on borrowings under our Credit Facility;

 

causing our failure to comply with the financial and restrictive covenants contained in our current or future indebtedness, which could cause a default under such indebtedness and which, if not cured or waived, could have a material adverse effect on us; and

 

affecting our ability to renew gaming and other licenses necessary to conduct our business.

We and our subsidiaries expect to incur substantial additional indebtedness in connection with the Isle Acquisition and may incur significant indebtedness in addition to the debt that we expect to incur in connection with the Isle Acquisition. Incurring more indebtedness could increase the risks associated with our substantial indebtedness

We and our subsidiaries may incur substantial additional indebtedness in the future. As of December 31, 2016, we had $121.0 million of borrowing availability under our Credit Facility and we had commitments for $1.75 billion of additional indebtedness that we expect to incur in connection with the Isle Acquisition.  Our existing debt agreements currently permit, and we expect that agreements governing debt that we incur in the future will permit, us to incur certain other additional secured and unsecured debt. Further, we may incur other liabilities that do not constitute indebtedness. The risks that we face based on our outstanding indebtedness may intensify if we incur additional indebtedness in the future, including as a result of the consummation of the Isle Acquisition.

24


 

We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to service all of our indebtedness and may be forced to take other actions to satisfy our obligations under our indebtedness, which may not be successful

Our ability to make scheduled payments on or to refinance our debt obligations depends on our financial condition and operating performance, which is subject to prevailing economic and competitive conditions and to certain financial, business, legislative, regulatory and other factors beyond our control. We cannot assure you that we will maintain a level of cash flows from operating activities sufficient to permit us to pay the principal, premium, if any, and interest on our indebtedness.

If our cash flows and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, we may be forced to reduce or delay investments and capital expenditures, or to sell assets, seek additional capital or restructure or refinance our indebtedness. These alternative measures may not be successful and may not permit us to meet our scheduled debt service obligations. If our operating results and available cash are insufficient to meet our debt service obligations, we could face substantial liquidity problems and might be required to dispose of material assets or operations to meet our debt service and other obligations. We may not be able to consummate those dispositions or to obtain the proceeds that we could realize from them, and these proceeds may not be adequate to meet any debt service obligations then due. Additionally, the agreements governing our existing debt limit, and the agreements governing debt that we incur in the future, including debt incurred in connection with the Isle Acquisition, are expected to limit, the use of the proceeds from any disposition; as a result, we may not be allowed, under these documents, to use proceeds from such dispositions to satisfy all current debt service obligations.

The agreements governing our debt impose significant operating and financial restrictions on us and our subsidiaries, which may prevent us from capitalizing on business opportunities

The agreements governing our existing debt impose significant operating and financial restrictions on us and we expect that agreements governing debt that we incur in the future, including debt incurred in connection with the Isle Acquisition, are expected to impose similar restrictions. These restrictions limit our ability, among other things, to:

 

incur additional debt;

 

create liens or other encumbrances;

 

pay dividends or make other restricted payments;

 

agree to payment restrictions affecting our restricted subsidiaries;

 

prepay subordinated indebtedness;

 

make investments, loans or other guarantees;

 

sell or otherwise dispose of a portion of our assets; or

 

make acquisitions or merge or consolidate with another entity.

In addition, the credit agreement governing the Credit Facility contains certain financial covenants, including minimum interest coverage ratio and maximum total leverage ratio covenants, and we expect that the credit agreement that we enter into in connection with the Isle Acquisition will contain similar financial covenants.

As a result of these covenants and restrictions, we are limited in how we conduct our business and we may be unable to raise additional debt or equity financing to compete effectively or to take advantage of new business opportunities. The restrictions caused by such covenants could also place us at a competitive disadvantage to less leveraged competitors.

A failure to comply with the covenants contained in the agreements governing our existing or future indebtedness could result in an event of default, which, if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of the indebtedness and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. If our indebtedness were to be accelerated, there can be no assurance that our assets would be sufficient to repay such indebtedness in full. Moreover, in the event that such indebtedness is accelerated, there can be no assurance that we will be able to refinance it on acceptable terms, or at all.

25


 

We are a holding company and will depend on our subsidiaries for dividends, distributions and repayment of our indebtedness

We are structured as a holding company, a legal entity separate and distinct from its subsidiaries. Our only significant asset is the capital stock or other equity interests of our operating subsidiaries. As a holding company, we conduct all of our business through our subsidiaries. Consequently, our principal source of cash flow will be dividends and distributions from our subsidiaries. If our subsidiaries are unable to make dividend payments or distributions to us and sufficient cash or liquidity is not otherwise available, we may not be able to pay interest or principal on our indebtedness.

The market price of ERI’s common stock could fluctuate significantly

The U.S. securities markets in general have experienced significant price fluctuations in recent years. The market price of ERI’s common stock may be volatile and subject to wide fluctuations. In addition, the trading volume of ERI’s common stock may fluctuate and cause significant price variations to occur. Some of the factors that could cause fluctuations in, or have a material adverse effect on, the stock price or trading volume of ERI’s common stock include:

 

general market and economic conditions, including market conditions in the hotel and casino industries;

 

actual or expected variations in operating results;

 

differences between actual operating results and those expected by investors and analysts;

 

changes in recommendations by securities analysts;

 

operations and stock performance of competitors;

 

accounting charges, including charges relating to the impairment of goodwill;

 

significant acquisitions or strategic alliances by ERI or by competitors;

 

sales of ERI’s common stock or other securities in the future, including sales by our directors and officers or significant investors;

 

recruitment or departure of key personnel;

 

conditions and trends in the gaming and entertainment industries;

 

changes in the estimate of the future size and growth of our markets; and

 

changes in reserves for professional liability claims.

We cannot assure you that the stock price of ERI common stock will not fluctuate or decline significantly in the future. In addition, the stock market in general can experience considerable price and volume fluctuations that may be unrelated to ERI’s performance. If the market price of ERI common stock fluctuates significantly, ERI may become the subject of securities class action litigation which may result in substantial costs and a diversion of management’s attention and resources.

ERI has not historically paid dividends a and may not pay dividends in the future

ERI does not currently expect to pay dividends on its common stock. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of the ERI board of directors and will depend upon among other factors, ERI’s earnings, cash requirements, financial condition, requirements to comply with the covenants under its debt instruments, legal considerations, and other factors that the ERI board of directors deems relevant. In addition, the agreements governing ERI’s indebtedness restrict its ability to pay dividends. If ERI does not pay dividends, then the return on an investment in its common stock will depend entirely upon any future appreciation in its stock price. There is no guarantee that ERI’s common stock will appreciate in value or maintain its value.

Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments.

None.

26


 

Item 2.  Properties.

Information relating to the location and general characteristics of our properties is provided in Part I, Item I, Business, Properties.

As of December 31, 2016, our facilities are located on property that we own or lease, as follows:

 

We lease approximately 30,000 square feet on the approximately 159,000 square foot parcel on which Eldorado Reno is located, in Reno, Nevada.

 

We also own a 31,000 square foot parcel of property across the street from Eldorado Reno and two other adjacent parcels totaling 18,687 square feet which could be used for expansion of Eldorado Reno.

 

Silver Legacy is located on five acres in Reno, Nevada.

 

Circus Reno leases approximately 36,000 square feet on the approximately 10 acres on which Circus Reno is located, in Reno, Nevada.

 

We lease approximately nine acres of land in Shreveport, Louisiana on which Eldorado Shreveport is located.

 

Mountaineer is located on approximately 1,680 acres of land that we own in Chester, Hancock County, West Virginia. Included in the 1,680 acres of land is approximately 1,290 acres of land that are considered non‑operating real properties that we intend to sell.

 

Scioto Downs is located on approximately 208 acres of land that we own in Columbus, Ohio.

 

Presque Isle Downs is located on 272 acres of land that we own in Summit Township, Erie County, Pennsylvania.

 

In addition, we own two other parcels of land: a 213‑acre site in McKean Township, Pennsylvania and a 6‑acre site in Summit Township that formerly housed an off‑track wagering facility. These two properties are considered non‑operating real properties that we intend to sell.

Substantially all of our assets are pledged to secure our outstanding indebtedness under the Senior Notes and credit obligations.

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings.

We are a party to various lawsuits, which have arisen in the normal course of our business. Estimated losses are accrued for these lawsuits and claims when the loss is probable and can be estimated. The current liability for the estimated losses associated with those lawsuits is not material to our consolidated financial condition and those estimated losses are not expected to have a material impact on our results of operations.

In connection with the Mergers, a class action lawsuit was filed by a purported stockholder of the Company alleging breach of fiduciary duty by the Company board of directors in connection with the Mergers. The case was filed on November 8, 2016 in the Second Judicial District Court of the State of Nevada and is captioned Assad v. Eldorado Resorts, Inc., et. al, case no. CV 16-02312. The case, which purports to be a class action on behalf of all of the stockholders of the Company, alleged, among other things, breach of fiduciary duty in failing to disclose all material information to stockholders in seeking approval of the issuance of shares of Company Common Stock in the Mergers and requested injunctive relief and an award of fees and costs incurred by the plaintiff in the action.

Item 4.  Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not applicable.

27


 

PART II

Item 5.  Market for Registrants’ Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

Our Common Stock is quoted on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “ERI”. On March 10, 2017, the NASDAQ Official Closing Price for our common stock was $18.05. As of March 10, 2017, there were 651 of record holders of our common stock.

The agreements governing our outstanding indebtedness restrict our ability to pay dividends. We historically have not paid cash dividends and do not intend to pay such dividends in the foreseeable future. For further information relating to our and our subsidiaries’ dividend policies, see Part II, Item 7, Liquidity and Capital Resources, included in this report.

The following table sets forth the range of high and low closing sale prices for our common stock for two most recent fiscal years.

 

 

 

Stock Price

 

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

Year Ended December 31, 2016:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

 

11.60

 

 

$

 

9.17

 

Second quarter

 

 

 

15.27

 

 

 

 

11.16

 

Third quarter

 

 

 

15.32

 

 

 

 

13.59

 

Fourth quarter

 

 

 

16.95

 

 

 

 

10.80

 

Year Ended December 31, 2015:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

 

5.68

 

 

$

 

3.81

 

Second quarter

 

 

 

8.76

 

 

 

 

5.00

 

Third quarter

 

 

 

10.04

 

 

 

 

7.56

 

Fourth quarter

 

 

 

11.61

 

 

 

 

8.47

 

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

The following table sets forth information as of December 31, 2016, with respect to compensation plans under which equity securities of the Company are authorized for issuance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

remaining available for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

future issuance under

 

 

 

Number of securities to

 

 

Weighted average

 

 

equity compensation

 

 

 

be issued upon exercise

 

 

exercise price of

 

 

plans (excluding

 

 

 

of outstanding options,

 

 

outstanding options,

 

 

securities reflected

 

Plan Category

 

warrants and rights

 

 

warrants and rights

 

 

in column (a))

 

 

 

(a)

 

 

(b)

 

 

(c)

 

MTR Gaming Group, Inc. 2010 Long

   Term Incentive Plan

 

 

169,300

 

 

$

 

9.94

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eldorado Resorts, Inc. 2015 Equity

   Incentive Plan

 

 

982,370

 

 

$

 

6.45

 

 

 

3,472,023

 

 

The Eldorado Resorts, Inc. 2015 Equity Incentive Plan and the MTR Gaming Group, Inc. 2010 Long Term Incentive Plan were approved by stockholders. No future equity awards will be made pursuant to the MTR Gaming Group, Inc. 2010 Long Term Incentive Plan (“MTR Plan”). However, outstanding awards granted under the MTR Plan will continue unaffected.

28


 

Stock Performance Graph

The following graph demonstrates a comparison of cumulative total returns of the Company, the NASDAQ Market Index (which is considered to be a broad index) and the Dow Jones US Gambling Index for the period since the Company’s common stock began trading on September 22, 2014. The following graph assumes $100 invested in each of the above groups and the reinvestment of dividends, if applicable.

Comparison of Cumulative Total Return Since the MTR Merger Date

Assumes Initial Investment of $100

December 2016

 

Past stock price performance is not necessarily indicative of future results. The performance graph should not be deemed filed or incorporated by reference into any other of our filings under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Exchange Act of 1934, unless we specifically incorporate the performance graph by reference therein.

Item 6.  Selected Financial Data.

The following table sets forth selected consolidated financial data of the Company for each of the five years ended December 31, 2016. This information should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements contained elsewhere in this report. Operating results for the periods presented below are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for future years.

On the Reno Acquisition Date we consummated the acquisition of all of the assets and properties of Circus Reno and the other 50% membership interest in the Silver Legacy Joint Venture owned by MGM Resorts International. On the Reno Acquisition Date, Eldorado Resorts LLC also exercised its right to acquire the 3.8% interest in ELLC held by certain affiliates and stockholders of the Company. As a result of these transactions, ELLC became a wholly-owned subsidiary of ERI and Silver Legacy became an indirect wholly‑owned indirect subsidiary of ERI.

The merger with MTR Gaming closed on the MTR Merger Date and has been accounted for as a reverse acquisition of MTR Gaming by HoldCo under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. As a result, HoldCo is considered the acquirer of MTR Gaming for accounting purposes. The financial information included in the following table for periods prior to the MTR Merger Date are those of Resorts and its subsidiaries. The presentation of information herein for periods prior to the MTR Merger Date and the Reno Acquisition Date and after the MTR Merger Date and Reno Acquisition Date, respectively, are not fully comparable because the results of operations for MTR Gaming and Circus Reno are not included for periods prior to the MTR Merger Date or Reno Acquisition Date, respectively, and the results of operations of the Silver Legacy Joint Venture were not consolidated prior to the Reno Acquisition Date (see Note 1 below).

29


 

SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

(dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

2016

 

 

 

2015

 

 

 

2014

 

 

 

2013

 

 

 

2012

 

 

Consolidated Statement of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casino

 

$

 

693,013

 

 

 

$

 

614,227

 

 

 

$

 

298,848

 

 

 

$

 

192,379

 

 

 

$

 

200,292

 

 

Pari-mutuel commissions

 

 

 

8,600

 

 

 

 

 

9,031

 

 

 

 

 

1,986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food and beverage

 

 

 

142,032

 

 

 

 

 

97,740

 

 

 

 

 

68,233

 

 

 

 

 

60,556

 

 

 

 

 

59,317

 

 

Hotel

 

 

 

94,312

 

 

 

 

 

37,466

 

 

 

 

 

28,007

 

 

 

 

 

26,934

 

 

 

 

 

26,203

 

 

Other

 

 

 

45,239

 

 

 

 

 

26,077

 

 

 

 

 

13,198

 

 

 

 

 

10,384

 

 

 

 

 

10,458

 

 

 

 

 

 

983,196

 

 

 

 

 

784,541

 

 

 

 

 

410,272

 

 

 

 

 

290,253

 

 

 

 

 

296,270

 

 

Less promotional allowances

 

 

 

(90,300

)

 

 

 

 

(64,757

)

 

 

 

 

(48,449

)

 

 

 

 

(43,067

)

 

 

 

 

(41,530

)

 

Net operating revenues

 

 

 

892,896

 

 

 

 

 

719,784

 

 

 

 

 

361,823

 

 

 

 

 

247,186

 

 

 

 

 

254,740

 

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casino

 

 

 

390,325

 

 

 

 

 

357,572

 

 

 

 

 

167,792

 

 

 

 

 

101,913

 

 

 

 

 

104,044

 

 

Pari-mutuel commissions

 

 

 

9,787

 

 

 

 

 

9,973

 

 

 

 

 

2,411

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food and beverage

 

 

 

81,878

 

 

 

 

 

52,606

 

 

 

 

 

37,411

 

 

 

 

 

28,982

 

 

 

 

 

29,095

 

 

Hotel

 

 

 

30,746

 

 

 

 

 

11,307

 

 

 

 

 

8,536

 

 

 

 

 

7,891

 

 

 

 

 

8,020

 

 

Other

 

 

 

26,921

 

 

 

 

 

15,325

 

 

 

 

 

9,348

 

 

 

 

 

7,290

 

 

 

 

 

7,279

 

 

Marketing and promotions

 

 

 

40,600

 

 

 

 

 

31,227

 

 

 

 

 

21,982

 

 

 

 

 

17,740

 

 

 

 

 

18,724

 

 

General and administrative

 

 

 

130,172

 

 

 

 

 

96,870

 

 

 

 

 

58,738

 

 

 

 

 

43,713

 

 

 

 

 

44,936

 

 

Corporate

 

 

 

19,880

 

 

 

 

 

16,469

 

 

 

 

 

4,617

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

 

63,449

 

 

 

 

 

56,921

 

 

 

 

 

28,643

 

 

 

 

 

17,031

 

 

 

 

 

17,651

 

 

Operating expenses

 

 

 

793,758

 

 

 

 

 

648,270

 

 

 

 

 

339,478

 

 

 

 

 

224,560

 

 

 

 

 

229,749

 

 

Loss on sale or disposition of property

 

 

 

(836

)

 

 

 

 

(6

)

 

 

 

 

(84

)

 

 

 

 

(226

)

 

 

 

 

(198

)

 

Acquisition charges

 

 

 

(9,184

)

 

 

 

 

(2,452

)

 

 

 

 

(7,411

)

 

 

 

 

(3,173

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity in income (losses) of unconsolidated affiliates(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,460

 

 

 

 

 

2,705

 

 

 

 

 

3,355

 

 

 

 

 

(8,952

)

 

Operating income

 

 

 

89,118

 

 

 

 

 

72,516

 

 

 

 

 

17,555

 

 

 

 

 

22,582

 

 

 

 

 

15,841

 

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

 

(50,917

)

 

 

 

 

(61,558

)

 

 

 

 

(30,734

)

 

 

 

 

(15,665

)

 

 

 

 

(16,055

)

 

Gain on extinguishment of debt of unconsolidated

   affiliate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11,980

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gain on valuation of unconsolidated affiliate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

35,582

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gain on termination of supplemental executive

   retirement plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

715

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss on property donation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(755

)

 

Loss on early retirement of debt, net

 

 

 

(155

)

 

 

 

 

(1,937

)

 

 

 

 

(90

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(22

)

 

Total other expense

 

 

 

(51,072

)

 

 

 

 

(27,913

)

 

 

 

 

(30,109

)

 

 

 

 

(3,685

)

 

 

 

 

(16,832

)

 

Net income (loss) before income taxes

 

 

 

38,046

 

 

 

 

 

44,603

 

 

 

 

 

(12,554

)

 

 

 

 

18,897

 

 

 

 

 

(991

)

 

(Provision) benefit for income taxes(2)

 

 

 

(13,244

)

 

 

 

 

69,580

 

 

 

 

 

(1,768

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

 

 

 

24,802

 

 

 

 

 

114,183

 

 

 

 

 

(14,322

)

 

 

 

 

18,897

 

 

 

 

 

(991

)

 

Less net income attributable to non-controlling interest(3)